Early Boat Design Project

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LohringMiller

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One of the first things I printed were sponsons for my P limited rigger. The great thing about 3D printing is that changes are easy so it's fun to experiment. For boat parts like these, adding perimeters with a low density three dimensional infill gives strong parts. My last efforts used 4 perimeters with 10% gyroid infill. I think even more perimeters with 5% infill would work and give an even lighter structure. PLA will never have the strength to weight of an epoxy/glass cover over a foam core. However, it's good enough for experiments. If you are happy with the result, it's easy to convert the form into female molds for epoxy/glass layup.

To do all this you need to learn a 3D modeling program. Fusion 360 is the most capable free program I know of. It will take at least a year of working with it to get proficient if you start from scratch. However, even old dogs can learn new tricks, so don't give up. Youtube has some great tutorials. Below are a few of the first examples of my sponsons. Next will be really accurate Merlin models.

Lohring Miller
 

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XtremeRcBoats

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Nice work Lohring, looks realy cool.

So this is jus a hollow sponson?
Could you stop it half way and add foam inside it?
 

Nigtmare

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Hey Lohring did you print them standing up and split in half and join them afterwards ??
 

LohringMiller

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I printed them in 3 pieces standing on end with a bulkhead at the joint. They are too long for my printer to print them on the side.lt center.jpglt front.jpglt rear.jpg
 

Nigtmare

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thats cool, what program are you using to be able to gyroid infill, my simplify3d doesn't have that option and printing with Klipper at speeds of 150mm's with honeycomb infill shakes my printer apart :( do you mind sharing the STL I would love to print some for a 21 hydro. Thanks.
Nick
 

LohringMiller

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I use the Prusa slicer that comes with my printer. I think it can be configured to work with other printers. The sponsons were designed in Fusion 360. I have several versions and the latest version is different than the one in the pictures. They were fast on the straight but the left sponson buried in the turn, slowing the boat. Brian Buaas also suggested a larger turn fin. I was ready to test it all this season against the stock Raptors and JAEs but it hasn't happened. I hesitate about giving out unproved designs.

My other project is a pair of P limited sport hydros. The first is a wood Arno Brits (sp?) sport 20 I bought 25 years ago. Alfred Lanza made a glass version he called the Leecraft sport 20. The other is a twin wing design with 3D printed wings. I got them assembled but neither has gotten wet.

Lohring Miller
 

Nigtmare

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I use the Prusa slicer that comes with my printer. I think it can be configured to work with other printers. The sponsons were designed in Fusion 360. I have several versions and the latest version is different than the one in the pictures. They were fast on the straight but the left sponson buried in the turn, slowing the boat. Brian Buaas also suggested a larger turn fin. I was ready to test it all this season against the stock Raptors and JAEs but it hasn't happened. I hesitate about giving out unproved designs.

My other project is a pair of P limited sport hydros. The first is a wood Arno Brits (sp?) sport 20 I bought 25 years ago. Alfred Lanza made a glass version he called the Leecraft sport 20. The other is a twin wing design with 3D printed wings. I got them assembled but neither has gotten wet.

Lohring Miller
Not a problem Lohring, I Understand not wanting to share an unfinished product if you ever do it would be great!! I have to ask my son if he can do anything with the gyroid infill I would love to try it. Thanks again keep safe...
 

LohringMiller

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I think any 3 dimensional infill would be fine. Look at this video for ideas.

Lohring Miller
 

Buoyhunter

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I've made a couple versions of sponsons for a JAE boat. Geraghty shipped me a set of prints a long time ago. It has maxxed out the printable area of the printer I have.JAE 12 Left Sponson V1.1.JPG
 

Nigtmare

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I've made a couple versions of sponsons for a JAE boat. Geraghty shipped me a set of prints a long time ago. It has maxxed out the printable area of the printer I have.View attachment 280018
That looks good!! I can print up to 17" diagonally thats almost enough for a 21 boat, with a split print you can print just about anything. maybe I will seat and design something since time is no object :) :p
 

LohringMiller

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It occurs to me that a better way to print my sponsons would be either on the side split down the middle, or with the running surface down. That way the layer alignment is along the long axis for better strength. You need to sand or cover the running surface in any case so having supports on the running surface would still work.

Lohring Miller
 

RaceMechaniX

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Hey guys, a technique I found that works for long sponsons is to split the sponson in half inbetween the booms. So you have a front half and a rear half. This particurily works well for tear streamlined shaped sponsons where the largest cross-section is somewhere in the middle. I print the sponsons vertically which also tends to give good print quality. In the case of a streamlined sponson I split it at the widest point like a parting line for casting. I design in one or two cylindrical passages that run North-South that I can use carbon or wood rod to connect the halves together after printing. I try have to have the rods long enough to tie in the front and rear booms going East-West.
 

LohringMiller

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3D printed objects are a lot weaker across the layer lines. Even so, my solid sponsons have been lighter than the OEM sponsons and strong enough so far. On riggers you want the booms to break before the sponsons. I consider hitting a buoy the required test. My first hollow design failed, but the filled sponsons with extra layers have held up. Below are pictures. The second is a failed print with rectilinear fill, but you get the idea.

Lohring Miller
P1010501.JPGP1010502.JPG
 

Notter Dean

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Aug 2, 2012
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hello,

I have been investigating printers largest enough to handle sponsons, what model are you finding good results. I am looking at printing with other materials other than nylon etc

dean
 

LohringMiller

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I use a Prusa, but there are larger printers these days like the Creality CR-10 series. I have printed a wide range of filaments including PETG, Ninjaflex, and Taulman 910 nylon. PLA is by far the most user friendly. Serious engineering filaments need a higher temperature than my printer has. I don't see the need for anything better than nylon. If you need strengths and temperatures beyond plastic, cast PLA patterns either with sand or investment casting techniques. Core boxes can also be 3D printed for sand casting.

Lohring Miller
 

Buoyhunter

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Dean
hello,

I have been investigating printers largest enough to handle sponsons, what model are you finding good results. I am looking at printing with other materials other than nylon etc

dean
I am using a Creality CR-10. Great printer for the money. I would opt for the CR-10S next time. For a couple reasons... The S has a filament sensor, which is an automatic shut off for the end of a filament roll or broken filament. It has a larger bed than a few other printers. It displays an estimate of the duration of print progress in percent. It also has dual Z-axis drives. Not a deal breaker but nice feature.
 

Carl Van Houten

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I use quite a few different 3d programs and the Fusion 360 may not be as powerful as some but it is a very friendly software package.
 

Nigtmare

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Dean

I am using a Creality CR-10. Great printer for the money. I would opt for the CR-10S next time. For a couple reasons... The S has a filament sensor, which is an automatic shut off for the end of a filament roll or broken filament. It has a larger bed than a few other printers. It displays an estimate of the duration of print progress in percent. It also has dual Z-axis drives. Not a deal breaker but nice feature.
my son has the same printer as you he really likes it, I have the Black widow with alot of mods and it prints good and very fast :p
 
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