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My latest video: Fiberglassing (how to)

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Samuel Hagan JR

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Jul 18, 2010
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On the subject of Epoxy. I got some Z-poxy 30 minute formula. It's extremely thick and very hard to use when I mix the resin and hardener. Can I use denatured alcohol to help the consistency out. Will it effect the the glue strength?
Sam,yes thinning 30 minute will probably degrade the strength a bit but can't tell you how much? I can tell you that 5 or 10 seconds in the microwave will loosen both resin and hardener up enough to make them thin. the only issue with microwave it cuts the pot life from 15 minutes to 10 minutes.
To follow the same subject:Do you recommend using denatured alcohol to thin epoxy/hardener to provide more optimal penetration into the grain for sealing wood hulls (not fibre-glassing)?
I was told Not to add anything to the glue for glueing structure support. Just sealing.
 

Bruce Clark

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Oct 27, 2013
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111
Great video. I would also be interested in going from a plug to a mold process. Thanks in advance.
 

BobBonahoom

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Mar 6, 2009
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525
Greg,

You just made my life a whole lot easier. I have always sealed my wood boats with Z-poxy finishing resin by mixing it up, applying it and then scraping off the excess off with an old credit card. It works, but there is still a lot of sanding and its a reall mess.

After doing a first coat my old way on this new Wild Thing mono hull, I then sanding it almost all off. Then I tried it your way for the second coat. I thinned the Z-poxy 50/50 with anhydrous (ultra dry) methanol and then just painted it on with a brush like you showed for your fiberglass method. I still can't believe how good it came out. It looks like a sheet of glass. The one difference is that I used ultra dry racing methanol rather than denatured ethanol. Methanol has twice the vapor pressure at 75 degrees as compared to ethanol, which just means it will flash off twice as fast. I still had plenty of pot life. I have used very small amounts of methanol to slightly thin epoxy with good rresults. I just never thought of thining it 50/50 before. It really worked well. Here is a pic.

Bob

Thinned Zpoxy.JPG
 

David Bryant

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Sep 7, 2011
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As fragile as many of the popular (wood) fabricated outrigger designs out there why don't many reinforce with fibreglass? Adds too much weight? Just not worth all the hassle in the end?

Seems it would, at least, be worth reinforcing the sponsons being they are most vulnerable?

I know many are reinforcing the internal compartments with carbon and glass cloth.
 

David Bryant

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Sep 7, 2011
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1,934
Nice video Greg. Your way of going over the steps was very methodical and easily understood. I may have to try making the tail set for my Executone as demonstrated, just to see how well they would turn out if nothing else. Have you done a video on mold making? That's one I really need to learn to do
I may have to do one on mold making. I get asked that often too. I'm by no means a pro at it but I do have a method that works especially good for one off's or a few pieces.

gh.
Greg, if you can, please demonstrate or explain your mold-making method. I'm very intrigued how this is done. I would like to fabricate molds for existing boats hulls and parts (ie. cowls, etc.,...). Thanks
 

Andy Brown

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Feb 8, 2003
Messages
2,657
Great "How Too" video Greg!

We use the same method on the tubs of our Riggers. Doing this work in the engine and tank bays and on the bottom at those areas greatly adds to the life of a rigger hull. It is well worth the investment of Time and Materials, and in my opinion is prefered over space consuming angle stock and doubler plates. The glass on the bottom and top surface under the engine and tank will completely eliminate stress cracks on the bottom sheet, something angle stock without glass can not do.

Some pics of a Twin 90 with glass layed and sanded are posted.

We use of 3/4 oz. for this work.

One layer of cloth across the inside bottom that turns up the sides to the top.

One layer on the outside bottom

Five layers on all vertical corners applied in one application with 1/2" to 1" lap to each adjacent surface.

Five to six layers on the shaft log inside and outside.

Same type of work is done inside the transom area.

Learning to do wrinkle free work will minimize sanding time and effort.

Be safe! Epoxy effects my nervous system. I can't get in a closed area with it even up to two weeks after it is cured.

If anyone has trouble sleeping at night, feels fidgety, or anxious after doing epoxy work, the epoxy is the cause. It will only get worse if you continue working with epoxy unprotected.

Dowling Park-20141126-01201.jpg

Dowling Park-20141126-01202.jpg

Dowling Park-20141126-01204.jpg

Dowling Park-20141126-01205.jpg

Dowling Park-20141126-01207.jpg
 
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David Bryant

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Sep 7, 2011
Messages
1,934
Great "How Too" video Greg!

We use the same method on the tubs of our Riggers. Doing this work in the engine and tank bays and on the bottom at those areas greatly adds to the life of a rigger hull. It is well worth the investment of Time and Materials, and in my opinion is prefered over space consuming angle stock and doubler plates. The glass on the bottom and top surface under the engine and tank will completely eliminate stress cracks on the bottom sheet, something angle stock without glass can not do.

Some pics of a Twin 90 with glass layed and sanded are posted.

We use of 3/4 oz. for this work.

One layer of cloth across the inside bottom that turns up the sides to the top.

One layer on the outside bottom

Five layers on all vertical corners applied in one application with 1/2" to 1" lap to each adjacent surface.

Five to six layers on the shaft log inside and outside.

Same type of work is done inside the transom area.

Learning to do wrinkle free work will minimize sanding time and effort.

Be safe! Epoxy effects my nervous system. I can't get in a closed area with it even up to two weeks after it is cured.

If anyone has trouble sleeping at night, feels fidgety, or anxious after doing epoxy work, the epoxy is the cause. It will only get worse if you continue working with epoxy unprotected.
Thanks for these tips Andy, great help!

When you mention (quote):

1. "One layer on the outside bottom"- are you referring to, literally, the bottom-side of the tub surface (making contact with the water)? How much (length-wise, fore & aft) of this section should be reinforced? Only underneath engine/tank compartment area only?
 
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