Savox SH-0256 Review?

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FloridaScaleBoater

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Oct 2, 2005
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Brad,
I have been using them in the sport-20, outside of the radio box.
Of course I disassemble and spray with Trio to water proof and use dielectric grease in the extension harness plugs.
But have held up good.
 

John Beardslee

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Apr 20, 2011
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Brad,
I have been using them in the sport-20, outside of the radio box.
Of course I disassemble and spray with Trio to water proof and use dielectric grease in the extension harness plugs.
But have held up good.
Rick, where you buying Trio? I used mine up and can’t seem to find a source.
Thanks, John
 

FloridaScaleBoater

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Oct 2, 2005
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Rick, where you buying Trio? I used mine up and can’t seem to find a source.
Thanks, John
Going to try to call company direct today, what I'm finding on-line is buying in case of 12.
Think people would buy @ $15.00 a can?
My original purchase was from Carlo @ C&C Racing.
Still have a partial & full can.
 

Mark Bullard

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Jan 26, 2004
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I like them and have had good luck with them along with the Hitec 82/85’s, but if you stall either for very long the wire becomes a fuseable link. Don’t ask me how I know.

You made some magic smoke.

Locked rotor at 6 volt is like 5.3 amps. Wire should hold for a bit.

When the locked rotor takes out the amplifier and it goes dead short then things get exciting really fast.
I can relate to that. They run on smoke and when you let the smoke out they quit working. KIMG2060.JPG KIMG2061.JPG
 

timothy johnson

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So this thread is about the Savox 256 servo which for me is great servo along with the rest of the Savox line of servos. All off you experienced RC boat racers know that the end point adjustment is the most critical adjustment for any brand of servo. So if you like Savox buy them and if you like another brand buy them. Keep in mind if you don't set them up correctly they will fail.
 

Daniel's Racing

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Yes sir. The throttle is of course the one likely to be the culprit. You never want to be over travelling at the high end or the braking end.

The steering and mixture usually are far from being able to lockup at any end of travel because you take that out to be able to drive with the steering and adjust the mix with mixture servo so they usually won't be over traveling.

The braking end of throttle. That is often overlooked as a problem epa setting but it surely it is.

Especially the braking end along with failsafe set to full back trigger. You don't think about how long the failsafe may be holding that position if it flips at beginning of a race. Only a slight strain beyond where it can easily travel can smoke it.

If it is pulling or pushing on the rod beyond where it can go and you flip the failsafe will fry your servo holding it in a position that puts high amount of strain on the servo.

The smaller the servo the more critical these settings are not over run. Doesn't take much locked rotor to fry the motor or usually the electronics in the servo feeding the motor. A servo is also a speed control basically and you can't overload it either. When the electronics burn up it often dead shorts itself and makes a mess of the radio equipment all the way through the receiver and switch on it's way to shorting out the battery.
 

Mark Bullard

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Yes sir. The throttle is of course the one likely to be the culprit. You never want to be over travelling at the high end or the braking end.

The steering and mixture usually are far from being able to lockup at any end of travel because you take that out to be able to drive with the steering and adjust the mix with mixture servo so they usually won't be over traveling.

The braking end of throttle. That is often overlooked as a problem epa setting but it surely it is.

Especially the braking end along with failsafe set to full back trigger. You don't think about how long the failsafe may be holding that position if it flips at beginning of a race. Only a slight strain beyond where it can easily travel can smoke it.

If it is pulling or pushing on the rod beyond where it can go and you flip the failsafe will fry your servo holding it in a position that puts high amount of strain on the servo.

The smaller the servo the more critical these settings are not over run. Doesn't take much locked rotor to fry the motor or usually the electronics in the servo feeding the motor. A servo is also a speed control basically and you can't overload it either. When the electronics burn up it often dead shorts itself and makes a mess of the radio equipment all the way through the receiver and switch on it's way to shorting out the battery.
Daniel, You seem to know a little about electric motors. Talking about lock rotor. Only someone that works in the field would know what that is. May I ask where you got your knowlege at?
 

Daniel's Racing

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Daniel, You seem to know a little about electric motors. Talking about lock rotor. Only someone that works in the field would know what that is. May I ask where you got your knowlege at?
I learned early about electric from my family's businesses.
We owned Boynton Radio & TV, Boynton Boats and Boynton Campers. I was always working on and/or fixing something. The television business paid all the bills. We had a large dealership originally selling half a dozen brands until Zenith proposed a deal to my dad for us to sell Zenith exclusively and that is what we finally did. New sales were only Zeniths.
I did not learn the electronics and television/radio repair very well. My dad didn't want me to know the television repair trade.
This was before the parts changing of entire circuit boards came about but it was in many TV though when he retired and all brands becoming solid state.

The boat and camper businesses didn't make a huge amount of income. We did build quite a few fully equipped Van conversions. Changed a lot of the canvas and the cables in pop up trailers. We carried a lot of stuff for campers and RV's.

I did learn a lot about DC wiring from our businesses. Used to do a lot of stereo installs as a little kid. Lots of wiring in Van conversions.

I then started working in the electrical trade when I was 15. I got my journeyman's License for Palm Beach County, Florida when I was 20.
Been in the electrical trade ever since.

I am pretty experienced in most of the trades and can do most basic plumbing and airconditioning installations and repair. Pretty good mechanic. Do a little welding and machining.

Got into the r/c boat hobby when I was 12 and been in and out of it many times ever since.

Love off roading and doing that as my hobby now, Bought a bunch of toys recently and go riding most every weekend. Yamaha YXZ 1000R SS SE, side by side, Yamaha Raptor 700 4 wheeler, YZ250 2 stroke, YZ450F four stroke and the latest is a '22 KTM 300 XC-W 2 stroke
 
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Mark Bullard

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Joined
Jan 26, 2004
Messages
1,748
I learned early about electric from my family's businesses.
We owned Boynton Radio & TV, Boynton Boats and Boynton Campers. I was always working on and/or fixing something. The television business paid all the bills. We had a large dealership originally selling half a dozen brands until Zenith proposed a deal to my dad for us to sell Zenith exclusively and that is what we finally did. New sales were only Zeniths.
I did not learn the electronics and television/radio repair very well. My dad didn't want me to know the television repair trade.
This was before the parts changing of entire circuit boards came about but it was in many TV though when he retired and all brands becoming solid state.

The boat and camper businesses didn't make a huge amount of income. We did build quite a few fully equipped Van conversions. Changed a lot of the canvas and the cables in pop up trailers. We carried a lot of stuff for campers and RV's.

I did learn a lot about DC wiring from our businesses. Used to do a lot of stereo installs as a little kid. Lots of wiring in Van conversions.

I then started working in the electrical trade when I was 15. I got my journeyman's License for Palm Beach County, Florida when I was 20.
Been in the electrical trade ever since.

I am pretty experienced in most of the trades and can do most basic plumbing and airconditioning installations and repair. Pretty good mechanic. Do a little welding and machining.

Got into the r/c boat hobby when I was 12 and been in and out of it many times ever since.

Love off roading and doing that as my hobby now, Bought a bunch of toys recently and go riding most every weekend. Yamaha YXZ 1000R SS SE, side by side, Yamaha Raptor 700 4 wheeler, YZ250 2 stroke, YZ450F four stroke and the latest is a '22 KTM 300 XC-W 2 stroke

I understand completely. I myself started winding electric motors when I was 10. Grew up in a electric motor shop. My family and me own and run a large motor shop in north Alabama. If you want to expand your knowlege come to north Alabama, I will give you a job
 
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