Creality Ender 3

Help Support intlwaters.com:

Samuel Hagan JR

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2010
Messages
4,257
I have a Creality Ender 3 coming and was wondering if anyone on here use it and what’s the best software to use for designing parts.
 

longballlumber

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2003
Messages
1,297

LibertyFrancis

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2021
Messages
67
Fusion 360 is where you need to go. They have a trial version for hobby users that allows 10 drawings/parts.
My recommendation is to get setup on that software and then follow some how-to videos from Lars.

Long time users of other software's like Solidworks are slowly transitioning over to Fusion 360.

His videos got me going in the right direction:

Fusion 360 Tutorial for Absolute Beginners— Part 1 - YouTube
 

Samuel Hagan JR

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2010
Messages
4,257
Fusion 360 is where you need to go. They have a trial version for hobby users that allows 10 drawings/parts.
My recommendation is to get setup on that software and then follow some how-to videos from Lars.

Long time users of other software's like Solidworks are slowly transitioning over to Fusion 360.

His videos got me going in the right direction:

Fusion 360 Tutorial for Absolute Beginners— Part 1 - YouTube
Awesome video. That helps a ton. Thank you very much.
 

LibertyFrancis

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2021
Messages
67
Looks like Soldworks has a new "maker" program for 99 bucks a year. Sounds feature rich..

Grim
That is good to know, they were trying to sell me on the business edition for some insane amount $$$$ yearly.
I cant say that there is anything lacking from Fusion 360 that I would want. It seems most of us get comfortable with a software and that is where we stay.
 

Grimracer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2001
Messages
8,531
Assemblies in Fusion are not a "strong" as SW.. but past that.. I dont care, I have no stake in the game.. Make mine SOLDWORKS! (and coming from 1000,s of hours of Inventor)

Grim
 

Grimracer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2001
Messages
8,531

longballlumber

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2003
Messages
1,297
I have yet to do any printing with ABS. I do have an encloser that needs to be finished before I start looking at ABS. Up to this point, I have had decent results with PETG and PETG+ from Inland (MicroCenter). I found for functional boat parts (non or low stress) PLA and PLA+ was too brittle. The PETG line has a little more elasticity.
 

Grimracer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2001
Messages
8,531
Have you printed much with TPU.. I have..

Polymaker #1
SainSmart #2
Ninjaflex.. #3 I like it, its OK but its a "tick" more challenging to print then the others.. (86A)
 

longballlumber

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2003
Messages
1,297
Have you printed much with TPU.. I have..

Polymaker #1
SainSmart #2
Ninjaflex.. #3 I like it, its OK but its a "tick" more challenging to print then the others.. (86A)
I haven't done anything with TPU. From what I read it's very abrasive and can be hard on the brass nozzle end.
 

longballlumber

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2003
Messages
1,297
What about Nylon X
At some point I would like to try and print Nylon but don't have the setup to do so yet. From the reading I have done Nylon can be very tricky. The following are some of the high level take-aways I have gotten from my reading.

* it likes to absorb water so it needs to be dry when printing and stored properly to avoid water absorption. Is some cases, I have see where makers are feeding the nylon filament directly from a drying/storage unit to the printer.
* Generally speaking; nylon needs to be printed at fairly high nozzle and bed temps. In most cases the required temps for nylon based materials can exceed or be very close to the capability limits of entry level machines.
* I don't immediately recall, but I do think you would need an enclosure to promote a warm environment.
* I think Nylon X specifically suggests the use of a harden nozzle.
* This goes for all 3D printing but, getting a good first layer (bed leveling) AND getting it to stick to the build plate (build plate material) are critical to success. I would expect Nylon to be one of the trickier materials to get sticking to the build plate.

Others have suggested Taulman 910, but I have yet to try it.



 
Last edited:

Samuel Hagan JR

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2010
Messages
4,257
I’ve watch a handful of tutorial videos and reading the differences of the filaments. I’ve been wanting one for a long time. Mine came in the mail yesterday so I’m ready to get going.
 

LohringMiller

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2017
Messages
686
I've printed in nylon, Ninjaflex, Varashore, PET, and PLA. PLA is much easier and close to the strongest of the unfilled materials. Prusament PC blend looks like the best if you really need an engineering grade plastic, but PLA has worked for most of my applications. Nylon MUST be dry immediately before printing and is prone to warping. The flexible filaments (Ninjaflex, Varashore) string and can't use supports. Printed flat, they work OK. PET is fine, but is more moisture sensitive than PLA. In all, I recommend PLA for all beginners.

Lohring Miller
 

Grimracer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2001
Messages
8,531
PUs by both Polyflex and SainSmart work fine with support..

Grim
 

Brad Christy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2002
Messages
1,270
I buy brass nozzles by the bunches.. change them often and if they touch the bed.. replace them..
Grim,

Why not just buy the ruby or carbide nozzle? Curious....

Thanks. Brad.
Titan Racing Components
BlackJack Hydros
Model Machine and Precision LLC
 

Latest posts

Top