2011 U-5 Graham Trucking Nitro Build..

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JimWalters

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Joined
Dec 13, 2021
Messages
24
Just thought I would share some pix of my work in progress.... Will have a CMB .67HR motor.. 1/8 scale..
 

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SayMikey

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 23, 2003
Messages
11,955
I wanted to do that boat but looks like a wrap is the best way to paint that. Ive opted for Hoss Mortage U10 on my new Moceri Hull 1653427918027.png
 

Rich Jones

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2005
Messages
662
Looking good so far. Nice job on those sponson tips. I’m with Mike, that paint job is gonna be a bear. How do you plan on going about it?
 

Hydro Junkie

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Joined
Oct 2, 2006
Messages
5,337
I have to agree, Mike. Last time I got an estimate, it was $200 for one color with clear over it. For five colors, I can easily $600-700, including taping off between them though, depending on the shop, I can also see labor time and masking material costs added on that paint scheme
 

K F Wheeler

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2021
Messages
231
Yes, cost for a really nice paint job is not cheap!!! Then you think how nice it would be to have all the guys at the race drooling over it "Man! That's nice!" and, so on... Then when it comes time to race... "Oh Man... Do I want to take a chance with this new boat?!?" Really hard decisions to make!! As hard or harder than the build!!! Haven't been in that situation yet, but, I'm really NOT looking forward to it either!!!

Ken
 

FloridaScaleBoater

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Joined
Oct 2, 2005
Messages
6,812
Yes, cost for a really nice paint job is not cheap!!! Then you think how nice it would be to have all the guys at the race drooling over it "Man! That's nice!" and, so on... Then when it comes time to race... "Oh Man... Do I want to take a chance with this new boat?!?" Really hard decisions to make!! As hard or harder than the build!!! Haven't been in that situation yet, but, I'm really NOT looking forward to it either!!!

Ken
Yup,
Just got done re-doing my 8255 hull as the KISW Miss Rock.
Decided to try some new props first time out with the new digs!!!
Flew her and busted the crap out of the cowling...
Two weeks before the Internat's
Ugly patched cowling here we come.
 

FloridaScaleBoater

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Joined
Oct 2, 2005
Messages
6,812
I'm curious,
what did you change from before? You find a really good prop?

Ken
It was haulin azz with this prop.
Going to require strut adjustments though,,
May be able to get back out this weekend.
 

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MikeWettengal

Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2018
Messages
14
It was haulin azz with this prop.
Going to require strut adjustments though,,
May be able to get back out this weekend.
I'm new to 1:8 building one now but aren't ABC high-rake props less than ideal for hydros? My understanding is the generate zero or even negative lift which seems unsuitable for a 3-point hydroplane and maybe even supported by the fact that it flew as a result?
 

Hydro Junkie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2006
Messages
5,337
That really depends on the boat and set up. Some boats work better with a non-lifting prop while others need a prop that lifts. It really depends on the prop weight or balance of the boat and the thrust angle of the drive. The only way to really find out is to try different props and see how the boat reacts.
 

Mike Cathey

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2006
Messages
1,166
Mike,

No matter what prop you end up with, you might consider going to something pretty tame like a Octura 460/2-3 or a Prather 250/255 and get the boat ride pretty well dialed in before making the jump to warp speed. The easiest way to set up a winged boat is to zero the angle on the wing and do your adjusting with the strut. Usually there's all kinds of props in the pits people will let you try. Maybe try to find someone that has the same boat/motor combo you do and ask them what they use and where their strut is set at.

Have some lead strips so you can add weight. If you gas it up and see the left sponson is lifting, that's prop torque, so then add a couple of ounces right on the left deck at the edge 3"4" forward of the sponson transom. Don't peel the tape strip off of the adhesive foam strip and then fasten to the boat with radio box tape so it won't bugger up your paint job.

If you are using a straight turn fin set it at about 8-10 degrees and observe the boat as it comes through the right turn. Keep tucking the fin under the boat until the right sponson isn't lifting in the turns. You want that right sponson planted on the hook with the boat dead flat in the turns.

A lot of how a boat corners has a lot to do with how you drive it. Practice setting the correct arc for whatever lane you are in and just let it run through the turn with a minimum of rudder input. Doing a lot of steering in the turns just kills speed and upsets the boat ride and can make the boat get stupid, especially after a few laps and the water gets torn up. The more speed you carry through the turns will increase the straightaway speed. Practicing setting your arc through the turns pays big dividends when you go into turn1 at the start of a race and your boat is hidden in other boats roostertails. When you come out of turns get out of the rudder as soon as possible and get the boat headed down the straight to improve your chute speed. Every time you move the rudder it's causing drag and slowing you down.

There's one thing the best driver's have in common. They are driving the best handling and easiest to drive boats.
 
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Hydro Junkie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2006
Messages
5,337
Mike,

No matter what prop you end up with, you might consider going to something pretty tame like a Octura 460/2-3 or a Prather 250/255 and get the boat ride pretty well dialed in before making the jump to warp speed. The easiest way to set up a winged boat is to zero the angle on the wing and do your adjusting with the strut. Usually there's all kinds of props in the pits people will let you try. Maybe try to find someone that has the same boat/motor combo you do and ask them what they use and where their strut is set at.

Have some lead strips so you can add weight. If you gas it up and see the left sponson is lifting, that's prop torque, so then add a couple of ounces right on the left deck at the edge 3"4" forward of the sponson transom. Don't peel the tape strip off of the adhesive foam strip and then fasten to the boat with radio box tape so it won't bugger up your paint job.

If you are using a straight turn fin set it at about 8-10 degrees and observe the boat as it comes through the right turn. Keep tucking the fin under the boat until the right sponson isn't lifting in the turns. You want that right sponson planted on the hook with the boat dead flat in the turns.

A lot of how a boat corners has a lot to do with how you drive it. Practice setting the correct arc for whatever lane you are in and just let it run through the turn with a minimum of rudder input. Doing a lot of steering in the turns just kills speed and upsets the boat ride and can make the boat get stupid, especially after a few laps and the water gets torn up. The more speed you carry through the turns will increase the straightaway speed. Practicing setting your arc through the turns pays big dividends when you go into turn1 at the start of a race and your boat is hidden in other boats roostertails. When you come out of turns get out of the rudder as soon as possible and get the boat headed down the straight to improve your chute speed. Every time you move the rudder it's causing drag and slowing you down.

There's one thing the best driver's have in common. They are driving the best handling and easiest to drive boats.
Funny how you talked about the wing. When the Pro Boat Buds first came out, there were plenty of posts, in another forum, about how the boats wanted to fly or were dragging the transom and the common response was "drop the rear of the wing, that's what it's for". When those that had more experience with winged boats responded with, "don't play with the wing, the boat is improperly balanced" or "try a lifting prop or changing the strut angle", they were told that they didn't know what they were talking about because someone got their boat to "run properly" by making the wing lift more by dropping the rear up to 30 degrees. Was kind if funny, those that tried to make the wing "do the work" generally put the boat on Ebay or returned it to the store while those that actually listened to those that race the boats not only kept their boats, they got them to run fairly well
 

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