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Stuck Sponsons on Tubes


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23 replies to this topic

#16 happybradboating

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 10:48 PM

Hello, I think what I would do is mask off the sponson rods with tape and paper. Then paint the hull as you see fit. I would say that is better than having to worry about damaging your sponson(s). I have personally ruined enough sponson's trying to get everything apart. If it is not wrecked leave the sponsons alone. If needed mask off the whole hull separately and spray the sponson's. Then reverse the process for the other part of the boat, i.e. hull. Just an afterthought!




Edited by happybradboating, 15 February 2018 - 10:58 PM.


#17 ThomasMoroney

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Posted 16 February 2018 - 09:10 AM

Yes that is true!

 

I did however just have an aha moment that allows the tubes to twist without harming the front aluminum rod, in theory.  Since the back aluminum rod is easily replaced, because its bolted in and accessible, you cut that one.  It is easily replaced with a new one.  This allows the sponson to spin with less heat needed then the straight pull method.





#18 Brian Sorgente

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Posted 16 February 2018 - 10:22 AM

Ohhh now that I see why you wouldn't want to remove the booms, or the front one anyway. I didn't realize I was built into the tub... Yes, if you cut the rear boom then you can twist the sponson and pull while you heat so you can salvage the front one. Might be good to have another person hold the aluminum tube with some plyers at the same time so you don't twist the boom loose from the front of the tub accidentally. Just wrap the aluminum with some scrap brass so you don't dig into it with the plyers.

 

When you get the sponson off, if you have trouble getting the brass tube off the aluminum you can use a cut off wheel on a dremel to slowly cut a notch down the length of the brass tube that was in the sponson. Cut little by little and when its VERY thin, take a flat head screwdriver and twist it in the slot. This should break it free so it will come off the aluminum tube without cutting into it.

 

Good luck and let us know how it turns out!

 

Brian  


Edited by Brian Sorgente, 16 February 2018 - 10:25 AM.


#19 Andy Brown

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Posted 16 February 2018 - 10:45 AM

I have been through all of this more than once.  We build hundreds of those boats and I fixed several of them.

 

My final best advice -  Fix the transom, paint it and go! 

 

You won't even have to install the sponson/boom screws.  Those sponsons will never move!



#20 ThomasMoroney

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Posted 16 February 2018 - 11:27 AM

Andy, you described the brass tube as held in by large dowels.  I assume they have a near same od to the aluminum rods. How are the dowels built into the sponson?  I need the picture painted in my head before I rationalize a restoration attempt, or I heed the safe play advice.  Thanks!



#21 Andy Brown

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Posted 16 February 2018 - 01:00 PM

Andy, you described the brass tube as held in by large dowels.  I assume they have a near same od to the aluminum rods. How are the dowels built into the sponson?  I need the picture painted in my head before I rationalize a restoration attempt, or I heed the safe play advice.  Thanks!

 

Thomas,

A 1" O.D. wood dowel with a 17/32" hole bored into it for the brass tube is glued into the foam core.  It is sandwiched between the inside sponson plate and an internal (not visible) sponson plate that is similar to the inner plate.

So there are a total of 3 sponson plates or formers .  The inner, the internal, and the outside chine plate. The top of the round 1" dowel is sanded flat before the sponson is decked.  Therefore the dowel is also secured to the deck.  The 1" dowel is as long as the bottom of the sponson is wide. The brass tube, which has a plug in the end to keep glue from entering into it is glued into the sponson after the sponson constructing is complete with 5 min epoxy. The brass tube passes through a 17/32" hole in the internal plate. Everything is assembled with 5 min epoxy.

It is a strong structure. Have never seen one total destroyed beyond repair, even after crashing into concrete wall.



#22 Brian Sorgente

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Posted 16 February 2018 - 03:50 PM

Yep the more I look at the pics the more I see what Andy means. Clean it up and paint it. Depending on how you tape off the tube when you spray it, you might be able to hide the cracks. You know they aren't going to com apart, would be a lot less work too.

 

Brian



#23 ThomasMoroney

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Posted Today, 09:24 AM

So I went down to The Hammers shop and we threw caution to the wind.  We cut the rear tube, applied heat, twisted, and out came all the brass.  No damage resulted in the brass removal.  I can also now repair a cracked dowel nearest the turn fin.  Upon removal we could see the dowel split as did the sponson skin due to the expanded brass I guess.  Easy fix.

Now the only oversight was the loss of aluminum rod due to the galvanic reaction.  The front aluminum rod measures in at .498x?  I will need to double check that later.  A brand new .5015 ID brass tube has notable play.

So Andy, how is the front rod pinned in the solid block up front?  As one of the plays here is remove a thin rectangle of ply sheeting and de pinning the rod.  Heat, twist, new rod.  Or perhaps drill out the pins with out touching the sheeting, other than hole repairs.
 


Edited by ThomasMoroney, Today, 11:08 AM.


#24 Ray Sametz

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Posted Today, 11:41 AM

So I went down to The Hammers shop and we threw caution to the wind.  We cut the rear tube, applied heat, twisted, and out came all the brass.  No damage resulted in the brass removal.  I can also now repair a cracked dowel nearest the turn fin.  Upon removal we could see the dowel split as did the sponson skin due to the expanded brass I guess.  Easy fix.

Now the only oversight was the loss of aluminum rod due to the galvanic reaction.  The front aluminum rod measures in at .498x?  I will need to double check that later.  A brand new .5015 ID brass tube has notable play.

So Andy, how is the front rod pinned in the solid block up front?  As one of the plays here is remove a thin rectangle of ply sheeting and de pinning the rod.  Heat, twist, new rod.  Or perhaps drill out the pins with out touching the sheeting, other than hole repairs.
 

Slow down! We got real lucky with getting the sponsons off, lets not push it. I Would not mess with that front boom tube in the nose. Call me I have a solution. ;)